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• Fermentation and Culinary Pickling

• Do Superfoods Really Exist?

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• Vegetable Notes

09/11/16

• Vegetable Notes

Link: http://forkedmagazine.org/2014/02/13/revealed-suffering-of-europes-hidden-tomato-slaves

00On February 9th 2018, the Aspen Institute hosted an animated discussion on the CIW’s Fair Food Program , its roots in the CIW’s twenty-year struggle to advance farmworkers’ fundamental human rights, and its remarkable potential for helping workers around the globe who toil at the bottom of corporate supply chains in dangerous, low-paying jobs. The idea for the panel was sparked by the publication late last year of a new book on the Fair Food Program , entitled “I Am Not a Tractor : How Florida Farmworkers Took on the Fast Food Giants and Won ,” by the Dean of the RAND Graduate School , Susan Marquis

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Almost half of all fruit and vegetables are wasted globally every year. But those peelings, stems and discarded leaves can be eaten - if we learn how

Just as nose to tail championed the use of the whole animal, root to shoot dining takes the leaves, flowers, stems, stalks, seeds and skins of produce and puts them to good use. The idea was pioneered by Tom Hunt , author of The Natural Cook and founder of Poco , which has outposts in London and Bristol. Chef Bruno Loubet also champions the principles at his Grain Store restaurant. “It allows us to make the most of fruits and vegetables throughout the year and not just when they’re in season,” he explains. “For example, before cherries have fully ripened we use cherry flowers in syrups and in salads with young beetroot.”

It’s good for home cooks, too. In the UK we throw away 25.5% of every melon and 38.7% of all lettuce, so root to shoot makes financial sense. It’s also good for you (for example, the stem of one broccoli contains more vitamin C than an orange.) So, what should you do with bits that usually end up in your bin?

• Buying Winter Vegetables

10 Hot Tips for Preserving Fresh Produce! (And Retaining Nutrients)

Okra

which we have always understood was an excellent vegetable for those suffering from diabetes to eat

Food safety when sprouting bean shoots and preparing fiddleheads

• Winter beet salad with maple candied pecans and pomegranate

• Cheesy Beets

Beetroot Curry with cottage cheese - and an M and S variation!
• Whilst beetroot, walnuts and goat’s cheese is a classic combination, often served as a salad, it’s great too as a soup. Add slices of Marks and Spencer’s Raven’s Oak goat’s cheese (£2.11 per 100g) to their Beetroot and Mint Soup (£2.50) and sprinkle with walnuts (optional)

Kale? Juicing? Trouble Ahead ...

• Growing Kale: The Ultimate Guide To Growing Your Own Superfood

Raw Broccoli and Bladder Cancer Survival

The stems of broccoli have a mild, sweet flavour and can be eaten raw, like carrot sticks, with hummus, or grated finely into coleslaw. They make a great base for pickles, too. Peel 4 broccoli stems and cut into long thin slices. Place in a jar, add ½ teaspoon of salt, cover and shake, then refrigerate overnight. Drain any water that’s accumulated, then add 1 minced clove of garlic, 1 tablespoon of sherry vinegar, and 2 tablespoons of olive oil and toss together. Refrigerate overnight then devour the garlicky goodness straight from the jar

Aubergine, in a pudding?

and so delicious you won’t even notice the lack of refined sugar! Great food using natural ingredients

• More Vegetable Notes

Are there evolutionary reasons
why toddlers avoid certain foods?

• Friday 17th February 2017 was
National Cabbage Day in the UK!

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A "How To" book aimed at the aspiring hostess. The author is an experienced hostess and cook who has lived internationally. This is reflected in the choice of menus and recipes, to which the Sufi Philosophy of Entertaining and the wisdom of Jelaluddin Rumi, the 13th century philospher and mystic poet, are backdrops. The author wants you, the host or hostess to be in a relaxed state of mind and to be up to enjoying their own party! The book covers how to prepare your home to receive guests and continues with how to create a convivial ambiance through your choice of music, table decorations, local splashes of colour and the use of flowers and strategically placed ornaments. How to lay a table for a sit down meal or how to display and serve finger food. Menus with approximate costings per person are considered, and when it is more appropriate to buy or to bake. Original recipes with full preparation and cooking instructions are included. Recipe combinations are considered, and dishes that can be cooked in advance and frozen recommended.

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